A busy week in the legislature

I wanted you to know that this second week of the House session was a busy one.

On Monday, I had my first Legislative Oversight Committee meeting. We heard public testimony from the Departments of Mental Health and Motor Vehicles and the Wil Lou Gray Opportunity School.

I had an Agricultural, Natural Resource and Environmental Affairs Committee meeting on Tuesday. We heard testimony from the Department of Natural Resources about the turkey population and proposed changes to the hunting season.

On Wednesday, the Opioid Abuse Prevention Study Committee met. Our committee recommended seven bills for sponsorship, one of which I’m the lead sponsor. It requires opioid abuse training as part of the continuing education requirements for veterinarians, who are able to prescribe opioids for animals that might fall into the wrong hands.

I cosponsored a bill that would prohibit actions by the state to facilitate seismic testing and the transportation or storage of Atlantic Ocean offshore oil or gas onto the land or waters of our state. We cannot risk our coastal economy and environment on the inevitable oil spills that come with offshore drilling.

I signed on as a cosponsor to a bill to further combat human trafficking. The bill revises the definition of "sex trafficking" to include certain sexual exploitation and prostitution offenses involving minors.

Gov. McMaster released his executive budget this week which includes an extra $1 billion of one-time money and tax revenues the state can expect to collect this year. I support the Governor on many of the issues in his proposed budget, including a five percent across-the-board salary increase for teachers that brings the average teacher salary above the southeastern average and using a part of the surplus for tax relief in the form of a tax rebate.

And finally, this week, I joined my fellow House members in unanimously supporting legislation to exempt federal workers in S.C. from being penalized for not paying their property taxes on time while the federal government is shut down.

I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve in the House of Representatives. Please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

Rep. Lee Hewitt


Honored to be in the House leadership

The legislative session started this week and I was appointed a majority whip by the House Speaker.

I’m honored to be in this House leadership position.

I was reappointed to the Agricultural, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs and Opioid Abuse Prevention Study committees and appointed to the Legislative Oversight Committee.

On Wednesday, I attended the inauguration of Gov. McMaster. His inauguration address focused heavily on tax reform, education reform, infrastructure and making sure South Carolina has a bright future. I appreciate the Governor’s leadership and his service to our state.

I wanted to make sure you had this link to my official House webpage, where you can find the bills that I have either sponsored or cosponsored, view my voting record, search for bills and access video feeds of the House sessions and committee meetings.

A bill I filed last session, that I refiled this session, would make it illegal to lure a child into a vehicle using things like candy or puppies. Click here for the bill.

Surprisingly, this is not already a crime in South Carolina. Last year, I was made aware of concerns by Mt. Pleasant town officials about attempted efforts by adults to lure children into cars or vans and the inability to charge the person with a crime.

Next week committees start working on bills. I have Legislative Oversight and Agricultural, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs Committee meetings on Monday and Tuesday respectively.

Tomorrow, I’m privileged to speak at the annual meeting of the Litchfield Country Club POA. I look forward to this opportunity to meet and hear from constituents.

It’s an honor and privilege to serve in the state House. Please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

Rep. Lee Hewitt


SC Representatives Lee Hewitt and Nancy Mace Refile Bill to Outlaw Child Luring

Child luring is not a crime in South Carolina after multiple
attempts reported in Mt. Pleasant and City of Charleston

Hewitt-Mace_III.jpegMT. PLEASANT, S.C. – Two lowcountry legislators refiled a bill Tuesday that would make it illegal to attempt to lure a child into a vehicle after multiple attempts to lure children were recently reported in Mt. Pleasant and City of Charleston. South Carolina has no law that makes child luring a crime.

Reps. Lee Hewitt, R-Georgetown and Nancy Mace, R-Charleston, refiled a bill they introduced in the last legislative session in response to multiple attempts of child luring in Mt. Pleasant and Charleston. Residents may recall a publicized event in October of 2017 when an individual attempted to lure multiple children into a van using a puppy.

Click here for the bill.

“Rep. Mace and I are one hundred percent committed to seeing this bill pass, giving law enforcement officers the tools they badly need to arrest these creeps who would do harm to our children,” Hewitt said. “The legislature must make this issue a priority. Children are at risk.”

“As a mother, it is mind blowing to me that the state of South Carolina hasn’t given law enforcement the tools necessary to arrest individuals who would attempt to lure a child away,” Mace stated. “After multiple attempts just in this last year alone, two in Mt. Pleasant and one on the Charleston peninsula, this legislation should be our number one priority when it comes to crimes against children.”

In October, Mt. Pleasant police reported a man in a U-Haul pick-up truck attempted to lure children into the truck with a bucket of gum. The man was stopped by police, but law enforcement was unable to charge him with a crime.

Click here for the news report.

Mt. Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie and police chief Carl Ritchie expressed strong support for the bill:

“We thank Representatives Hewitt and Mace for representing Mount Pleasant so well in the legislature and for introducing this bill. Our town council looked into this matter after several local incidents raised public awareness and we back our fine law enforcement professionals in recommending passage of this bill in order to protect our children,” Mayor Haynie said.

“The current state kidnapping statute allows for law enforcement to make a charge of ‘attempted kidnapping’, however it does not address the act of luring a child in the detail the proposed anti-luring law would provide,” Chief Ritchie said. “As a law enforcement official with over 30 years’ experience I support the proposed anti-luring law and know it would better equip law enforcement agencies when dealing with situations outlined in the law and provide the level of protection our children deserve.”

The state House will take up the bill when the session starts January 8th.


Rep. Lee Hewitt’s interview by Quintin Washington

Monday, November 19th, Rep. Lee Hewitt did this video interview about his second term in office with Charleston journalist Quintin Washington on his Quintin’s Close-Ups web show. Lee talked about some of his legislative priorities, which include education improvement, stopping offshore oil drilling off our coast and road improvements like construction of the badly needed Southern Evacuation Life Line Hwy.


Goldfinch and Hewitt: Recent flooding spotlights need for evacuation highway

By Sen. Stephen Goldfinch and Rep. Lee Hewitt

Hewitt-Goldfinch_copy_II.jpgIn the month of September, Georgetown and Horry counties faced a disaster on two fronts. First, as Hurricane Florence slowly moved toward the coast we faced a strengthening category four storm. Then, as it moved ashore in North Carolina, we watched the storm stall and dump up to 17 inches of rain into the watershed that drains into rivers that feed into Winyah Bay.

Both of these scenarios required the local Emergency Operations Centers to call for evacuations of the affected areas. Luckily, we were spared damage from the land fall of Florence. However, we were not so lucky from the affects of the rainfall. The flooding caused closure of Highways 501, 22 and 9 in Horry County and aqua dams were installed on Highways 17 and 521 in Georgetown County as the Dept. of Natural Resources flood modeling projected these roads would become impassable as well. If Hwy 17 had become inundated with flood waters as predicted this would have been a nightmare situation for both counties, with the Grand Strand and particularly the Waccamaw Neck becoming inaccessible islands.

As we look back and review the outcome, it’s obvious the proposed Southern Evacuation Lifeline Highway (SELL) must become a priority for the safety of our residents and visitors. This proposed 28-mile limited access highway connecting Hwy 31 with U.S. 378 would vastly improve access across the Waccamaw River between Conway and Georgetown, providing a needed additional transportation corridor in the event other vital roadways became flooded and impassable.

Studies by the S.C. Dept. of Transportation and the Myrtle Beach Chamber of Commerce show the SELL project will reduce traffic congestion, improve road network efficiency and significantly expedite hurricane evacuations, particularly for Georgetown County, and now it’s clear the project would also improve safety in the event of flooding.

Planning for this important road began in 2003 and a feasibility study was completed in 2009. Currently, Horry County has allocated $25 million for the final environmental impact study, road design and right-of-way acquisition. This is a drop in the bucket compared to the estimated $600 million price tag. While there are many road improvements that are important and needed in our area, we call on our Congressional delegation to help us find funding for this very important evacuation route.

Recently, Gov. Henry McMaster issued an executive order creating the S.C. Floodwater Commission, which we applaud. This commission is tasked with identifying potential short and long-term mitigation solutions for low lying and coastal areas along the state’s rivers. We ask this commission to address a flawed FEMA home buyout program that bars many hard-working families impacted by flooding from qualifying for the mitigation program. We also ask for additional funding to improve the accuracy of the DNR flood modeling, which was flawed, particularly for Georgetown County. It is vital that local Emergency Operation Centers and the residents of affected areas have the best possible information to plan for a flood event.

It is important that we begin to address these critical needs as soon as possible to ensure the safety of our residents and visitors.

Sen. Goldfinch and Rep. Hewitt live in Murrells Inlet and represent Districts 34 and 108 respectively in the SC General Assembly.


Hewitt named Legislator of the Year

First freshman legislator ever named Legislator of the Year

COLUMBIA -- Rep. Lee Hewitt, R-Georgetown, along with Rep. Heather Ammons Crawford, R-Horry, were named Legislators of the Year Monday by the S.C. Association of Realtors.

Hewitt-Ammons_SCAR_award_copy.jpg

Reps. Lee Hewitt and Heather Ammons Crawford with their awards.

Hewitt is the first freshman legislator to ever win the award.

“I’m honored to have been awarded Legislator of the Year, particularly as a freshman legislator,” Hewitt said. “My sincere thanks to the association for this award.”

Hewitt was the lead sponsor for legislation signed into law this year that reforms the process for determining beachfront jurisdictional lines. Where these lines are drawn impacts first, and in many cases, second row properties regarding the structures that can be built or rebuilt.

Hewitt was a cosponsor of the S.C. Homeowners Association Act, which was also signed into law this year. This reform legislation requires increased HOA transparency concerning notices, budgets and documents.

Hewitt, a Murrells Inlet realtor, serves on the House Agricultural, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs Committee and Environmental Affairs Subcommittee, Opioid Abuse Prevention Study Committee and Offshore Drilling Ad-Hoc Committee.

He is also a former S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control board member.


Busy summer

I hope you’re doing well. The summer seems to be flying by. I know a lot has been happening from a state and county perspective.

Last month I participated in Liberty Steel’s reopening ceremony of the Georgetown mill and got to meet Liberty House Group chairman Sanjeev Gupta. The reopening is great news for the city, county and especially for all the families hurt by the steel mill closing in 2015.

The legislature was back in session for two days last month. I’m glad we were able to finally pass a bill providing SCE&G ratepayers with substantial relief from the costs of the failed nuclear reactor project and repeal the Base Load Review Act, which enabled the nuclear fiasco.

It looks like we’ll be back in session this fall to vote on Gov. McMaster’s budget vetoes.

One of the vetoes I will vote to overturn is the Governor’s veto of $300,000 for needed dredging in Murrells Inlet. Boat access to the channels in the inlet is vital to the economy of Murrells Inlet, Garden City Beach, Georgetown and Horry counties and this state. A plan needs to be developed and funded to deal with the continued siltation of the channels.

I appreciate the Murrells Inlet-Garden City Fire District Board’s decision to postpone its millage increase referendum that was scheduled for this month until required financial audits are completed by the district. Last month, Sen. Stephen Goldfinch, Rep. Russell Fry and I asked the board for the postponement. It’s important that these required outside audits be completed and reviewed by the board and the public before moving forward with a referendum.

On Wednesday, August 8th at 5:30 pm, Sen. Stephen Goldfinch, Rep. Russell Fry and I have scheduled an informational meeting at the Murrells Inlet Community Center for property owners affected by the Horry-Georgetown County border error. The public is welcome to attend.

For many years, Horry and Georgetown counties have recognized a border that differs from the official border as enacted in statute. As a result, about 200 parcels of land, long believed to be in Horry County, are actually in Georgetown County, raising potential issues concerning property taxes, school attendance and voting.

A bill I cosponsored gives Gov. McMaster the authority to call for a referendum in the affected area to allow voters to decide as to whether they wish to stay residents of Horry County or officially become part of Georgetown County.

And finally, our thoughts and prayers are with Sen. Greg Hembree, R-Horry, and his family. Sen. Hembree suffered a brain aneurysm last week. We wish him a speedy recovery.

I’m thankful for the opportunity to represent District 108. Please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

Rep. Lee Hewitt

Please click here to donate to my reelection campaign.


A busy month

Since the House adjourned last month, I’ve been very busy.

Hewitt_-_Pence_and_McMaster_copy.jpg

Yesterday, Whitney and I were privileged to be with Vice-President Mike Pence and his wife Karen and Gov. Henry McMaster and his wife Peggy when they visited Myrtle Beach. It was an honor to have Vice-President Pence and Gov. McMaster on the Grand Strand.

This month I spoke at the ceremony renaming the North Causeway in Pawleys Island the Linwood Altman Causeway in honor of the former state legislator and community leader who recently passed away. I was a sponsor of the legislation that enabled the name change. Click here for news coverage.

Last Tuesday, I was on WGTN News Talk radio with former Georgetown Mayor Jack Scoville discussing state and district issues and answering questions.

Also, on Tuesday, I spent the afternoon at the Georgetown office of the Dept. of Employment and Workforce learning about all the services they provide for businesses and the community. I appreciate the opportunity to meet the staff and greatly appreciate their hard work and dedication.

On Thursday at the Tidelands Health board meeting I was privileged to present Dr. Gerald Harmon with a resolution passed by the General Assembly congratulating and honoring him for being named chairman of the American Medical Association. Dr. Harmon is truly a leader in medical care in our county, state and nation and is very deserving of this honor.

Today I’ll be attending Liberty Steel’s reopening ceremony of the Georgetown mill. The reopening is great news for the city, county and especially for all the families hurt by the steel mill closing in 2015.

On Wednesday and Thursday, the House will be back in session to deal with the state budget and legislation that addresses the V.C. Summer nuclear reactor spending disaster.

So far, the conference committees that were tasked with ironing out the differences between House and Senate versions of the budget and legislation aimed at protecting utility ratepayers have failed to reach agreement, so the session may not be productive.

My thoughts and prayers are with my House colleague and District 1 GOP Congressional candidate Katie Arrington, who was seriously injured in a car accident on Friday night in Charleston.

I urge you to vote tomorrow in the Republican runoff election for Governor and Attorney General. Any registered voter can vote in the election except those that voted in the June 12th Democratic primary. The polls are open from 7 am to 7 pm. Click here for polling place locations.

I’m thankful for the opportunity to represent District 108. Please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

Rep. Lee Hewitt

Please click here to donate to my reelection campaign.


End of the legislative session

After casting over 800 votes, the regular session of the legislature ended last Thursday.

Importantly, several bills of local significance passed last week and head to Gov. McMaster’s desk for his signature.

On Wednesday, a bill I cosponsored to fix the Horry-Georgetown County border error passed.

For many years, Horry and Georgetown counties have recognized a border that differs from the official border as enacted in statute. As a result, about 200 parcels of land, long believed to be in Horry County, are actually in Georgetown County, raising potential issues concerning property taxes, school attendance and voting.

The bill gives Gov. McMaster the authority to call for a referendum in the affected area to allow voters to decide as to whether they wish to stay residents of Horry County or officially become part of Georgetown County.

A bill I supported to protect red drum from overfishing passed. This fishery is very important to our recreational and charter fishermen.

A recent SC Dept. of Natural Resources stock assessment of red drum determined the stock is overfished and that current landings are unsustainable. The bill reduces the daily bag limit from three per person to two per person and institutes a boat limit of six fish per day. The current size slot limit of 15 to 23 inches for red drum would remain the same.

From a statewide perspective, a bill passed this week to place a constitutional amendment question on the ballot in November that asks voters if they approve of granting the governor the authority to appoint the state superintendent of education instead of keeping it as an elected position. If voters approve, the final election for the position will be this year.

While the legislative session has ended, there is still unfinished legislative business, so there will be special legislative sessions on May 24-25 and June 27-28 to deal with legislation related to the failed VC Summer nuclear reactor project and to finalize the budget respectively.

I’m thankful for the opportunity to represent District 108. Please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

Rep. Lee Hewitt

Please click here to donate to my reelection campaign.


One week left

I wanted you to know that there is just one week left in the legislative session.

Last week, the House took a major step to make our public schools safer by making it easier to hire school resource officers. There are currently 590 public schools in the state that don’t employ a school resource officer.

Many retired law enforcement officers have expressed interest in using their previous training to work as a school resource officer. However, current state law caps salaries of retired state employees at $10,000 a year. To fix this problem, the House lifted the $10,000 cap so retired state workers can apply for the many open school resource officer positions.

A bill I cosponsored to increase the transparency of homeowners associations, the S.C. Homeowners Association Act, passed both the House and Senate and awaits Gov. McMaster’s signature.

The bill provides for the recording of the governing HOA documents with the Register of Deeds or Clerk of Court, notice to homeowners when there is any increase in the annual budget, notice on the seller’s property disclosure statement that the property is governed by an HOA, and allows magistrates concurrent jurisdiction to handle monetary disputes. The bill also creates a Homeowners Association Ombudsman within the South Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs. This legislation would implement consistent guidelines that encourage good governance among HOAs and protect homeowners' interests.

Last week, the House voted to place a constitutional question on the ballot that asks voters if they approve of granting the governor the authority to appoint the state superintendent of education instead of keeping it as an elected position. If voters approve, the final election for the position will be in 2018 with the governor having the power to appoint the position after the conclusion of that four-year term.

It’s an honor to serve the district. Please let me know if I can be of any assistance.

Rep. Lee Hewitt

Please click here to donate to my reelection campaign.